How to Attract Recruiters With Social Media

March 31st, 2014

It’s part of a growing trend: recruiters, both in-house at big companies or from retained search firms, are proactively seeking out and contacting candidates.

Whether you’re actively looking for a job or not, being contacted by a recruiter can be a major boost to your career. So how can you help this happen for yourself?

Most of these recruiters are finding potentials on social media sites, like LinkedIn and Twitter. They’re using big­data­based algorithms that are both fast and cheap, and that can dig up just about everything about you. For example, if you tweet about your love for fresh seafood and your membership in the Fenway Fanatics, a company from Boston might tag you as a possibility if they’re looking for someone in your field.

If you’re hoping to attract job offers, you have to strengthen your online “signal.” How can headhunters find you? What can you showcase online that’s special about you, and how— through a website, blog or consistently updated LinkedIn profile?

  • Be sure your presence is consistent and honest across all media. For example, your LinkedIn profile should align with your resume. For example, the jobs, including titles, should be exactly the same. Inconsistencies will make recruiters suspicious.
  • Avoid negativity. If all you use social media for is to complain, you won’t be getting any calls. Constant ranting will turn employers and recruiters off. If your boss, your job or your life are truly that terrible, tell a friend over drinks rather than making negative remarks on Twitter, Facebook or Google+.
  • Share your positive activities. Are you running a 5K for charity? Post pictures. Mentoring younger staff? Tweet about that. You want employers to know you’re a caring, involved person—the type they should want on their team.

But the first thing you have to do? Clean up your online presence. According to a 2013 study by CareerBuilder, employers have not hired certain candidates over concerns about their social media presence. The top two negative behaviors mentioned by employers were 1) provocative/inappropriate photos and/or information (50%) and 2) information about candidate drinking or using drugs (48%). In third place? Badmouthing a previous employer (33%). Research yourself to find out what potential employers will find and do your best to counteract anything negative with a positive impression.

Today your online presence is probably more important than your resume, so use it wisely. If you play your cards right, the next call you get might be a recruiter with a fantastic job for you! For help finding your next career opportunity, contact the recruitment team at Synerfac! We would love the chance to match you to a great job opening.

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